17,300-Year-Old Star Map In Lascaux Cave

The Lascaux cave paintings are estimated to be 17,300 years old and they also feature the oldest identified star map on Earth.

Michael Rappenglueck of the University of Munich argues that many of the images in the Lascaux cave depict the constellations of Taurus, the Pleiades, and the celestial grouping known as the “Summer Triangle.”

French researcher Chantal Jègues-Wolkiewiez further suggests that the gallery of images in the Great Hall symbolizes an extensive star map and that key points accurately correspond to the main constellations as they would have appeared in the Paleolithic age. She also believes these locations were specifically selected since most of them are illuminated by the setting sun on the day of the Winter Solstice.

The cave paintings feature appropriately configured images that appear as constellations, correspond with the constellations as they would have appeared in the Paleolithic age, displays a lunar calendar, and are mostly in locations illuminated by the sun on the day of the Winter Solstice. For many, the above mentioned eliminates coincidence from the equation.

For more info on this ancient star map, check out the two (1, 2) interviews BBC News did with Michael Rappenglueck.

stly in locations illuminated by the sun on the day of the winter solstice. For many, the above mentioned eliminates coincidence from the equation.

For more info on this ancient star map, check out the two (1, 2) interviews BBC News did with Michael Rappenglueck.

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